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Tip for direct mail
1. NCOA (National Change of Address): all of the lists which you are using for your mailing. This process standardizes all of the addresses so that they conform to U.S. Post Office guidelines. It also corrects the addresses of people who have moved. Using NCOA will ensure maximum deliverability. 2. MERGE/PURGE: If you are using a number of lists for your mailing, this process will eliminate and consolidate duplicates between the various lists so that each name receives only one package. This saves the cost of mailing two or more pieces to one person. 3. DMA PANDER FILE: The Direct Marketing Association maintains a list of people who do not want to receive Direct Mail. Passing the list or lists you are mailing against this file will eliminate these people from your mailing. When using Direct Mail it is of equal importance to know who NOT to mail to. Most computer service bureaus have a copy of this pander file. 4. HOUSE PANDER FILE: Along the same lines as the DMA Pander File, this is a file that you create from the names and addresses of people who have told you that they do not want to receive mail from you. 5. NET NAME ARRANGEMENTS: When using more than one or two lists, especially lists made up from similar sources, sometimes many names will appear on more than one list. If the number of repetitive names is around 25,000 or more, be sure to inquire about the availability of a net name arrangement. This allows you to pay full price for a mutually agreed percentage of the names received and only running charges on the balance. You will usually need computer verification of the percentage of the names mailed. 6. PRESORTING & BARCODING: 99% of all mailing lists are provided in Zip Code sequence. You can save money when using a large number of names by having the names further presorted and grouped by Bulk Mail Center, SCF, Zip+4, Carrier Route, or Walk Sequence. How far you can presort depends upon the quantity of names you are mailing and their geographic concentration.